Sweet Bay Magnolia - Magnolia virginiana

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Sweet Bay Magnolia

Sweet Bay Magnolia is sometimes called sweetbay, swampbay, or swamp magnolia. It usually grows in moist and wet soils in wetland areas such as swamps and along streams and ponds. It has creamy white flowers with a sweet fragrance. The leaves are pale green and have a silvery underside. The fruit on the tree is eaten by turkeys, quail, and numerous songbirds. It grows to a height of anywhere from 10 to 60 feet. It is native to the southern US and along the east coast.


Sweet Bay Magnolia is a Host Plant for Tiger Swallowtails

Tiger Swallowtails use Sweet Bay Magnolia as one of their host plants, but they use many others too, mostly in the Magnolia family such as Tuliptrees/Yellow-poplars, but also Hop Trees.


Where to buy Sweet Bay Magnolia

You can order these online from Nature Hills Nursery. You can also read more information about them at Nature Hills Nursery site to either order, read more detailed information about about Sweet Bay Magnolias or see more detailed pricing information. Or order by calling 1-888-864-7663 using the Source ID: 86642! You can also sign up to have a seed and plant catalog from Nature Hills Nursery mailed to your home to order from also.


The Magnolia/Magnoliaceae Family

The Magnolia/Magnoliaceae Family has about 200 species of trees and shrubs. Eleven trees are native to N. America.




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