Zebra Swallowtail - Eurytides marcellus

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An adult Zebra Swallowtail.



Zebra Swallowtails have a wingspan of around 1.9 to 3 inches wide. They are mainly forest, semi-wooded dwellers, often seen in low moist spots where there is Pawpaw growing. They have several generations per year and adults use flower nectar as a food source. Adults in the spring tend to be a bit smaller than the ones in the summer.

Their range includes most of the eastern US. Their main host plant is Pawpaw - Asimina triloba. In some southern state they may also use some smaller PawPaw family plants such as Asimina parvifolia, speciosa, pygmaea, obovata, and reticulata.

Their eggs are light green and laid singly on the host plants. Although I have not yet seen eggs left on my pawpaws I have been able to get some pictures of later instar caterpillars.

Here is what I think is a late 4th instar getting close to molting:



Here is a 5th instar:



Fifth instar getting close to pupating - notice the pretty blue, black and yellow bands behind its head:



5th instar, with a ruler to get a better idea of the size:



Almost ready to do its last molt and start pupating:



Here is a Zebra Swallowtail pupa:



Adult from the side - notice the really long tails and the pretty black and white striped body:



Adult with wings open:




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